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S-Corporation Lawyer in Anaheim

Definition of a Subchapter S Corporation

An “S-Corporation” is a regular corporation that has between 1 and 100 shareholders and that passes-through net income or losses to shareholders under in accordance with Internal Revenue Code, Chapter 1, Subchapter S. Corporations must meet specific eligibility criteria, and they must notify the IRS of their choice to be taxed as an S-Corporation within a certain period of time.

Taxation of Regular Corporations

A regular corporation, sometimes called a “C” Corporation (after Subchapter C of the Internal Revenue Code), is taxed as a separate business entity. Corporations have their own tax form (1120) and their own tax rates (C Corp tax rates). Corporations may choose to retain their profits and earnings as part of their operating capital, or they may choose to distribute some or all of their profits and earnings as dividends paid to shareholders.

Dividends paid to shareholders are essentially taxed twice. They are taxed once at the corporate level (on the corporation’s Form 1120), and again at the individual level (on the person’s Form 1040).

Taxation of S-Corporations

An S-Corporation is not subject to corporate tax rates. “Generally, an S corporation is exempt from federal income tax other than tax on certain capital gains and passive income,” according to the Internal Revenue Service.

Instead, an S-Corporation passes-through profit (or net

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Eldessouky Law - 2017
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